High Line Advisors LLC

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Archive for January 2011

Finding New Revenue Opportunities

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[part of a series on hedge fund sales coverage]

Existing client revenues may be sustained or even increased in a bull market, but a firm stands a better chance of achieving growth even in bear markets if planning is deliberate and focused on specific opportunities. Fortunately, new revenue opportunities may be found through direct client feedback and some basic marketing.

Sales managers need a minimum amount of useful data that can be acted upon for maximum impact on revenue. A practical client plan must be succinct, easily prepared and easily understood. The planning must be done by the salespeople who know the client best, but supported by data and standards for comparison. Many client planning processes either have too little data or become frustrated in their attempts to collect too much detail. At one extreme, plans based on salesperson intuition are not robust and may be clouded by incentives. At the other extreme, it is impossible to collect precise data from clients who are unwilling to disclose the details of their product utilization or spending to the broker community as a whole. Industry-wide surveys and fee pools may be directionally useful but are not specific enough to optimize the unique relationship between an individual broker and client.

Developing Client Plans

In our experience, a basic but useful client plan consist of three items: an organization chart of the client at the fund level, a budget showing revenue expectation at the product level), and one or more action items required to achieve the budget.

At a minimum, an organization chart for an institutional investor should indicate:

  1. assets under management (using size as a rough proxy for revenue potential)
  2. allocation of assets among various investment strategies (using strategy as an indicator of product and resource needs)
  3. decision makers for each strategy (to identify whom to target for relationship building)

It is best to ask the client directly rather than to rely on assumptions that may be incorrect or incomplete. A map of the client organization can expose any misconceptions regarding their investment activity and lead to the discovery of new revenue opportunities. For example, a convertible bond salesperson may not register that the client also has a distressed equity fund until the salesperson is asked to map the entire client organization. The investment strategies used by the client immediately suggest product utilization, which can be confirmed in subsequent discussions with the client. Existing relationships can provide the introductions needed to open up new trading lines. Simply “connecting the dots” in this way does not require elaborate planning and can yield immediate results.

The next step is to identify potential for revenue improvement. We suggest that detailed knowledge of a client’s wallet are not necessary to manage a successful sales effort. Instead, only a few key pieces of information are needed, and these may be readily extracted from the clients themselves:

  1. What is the firm’s rank with the client? For each product the client trades (i.e., single stock cash), where does the client currently rank the firm? #1? Top 3? Top 5? First tier? Second tier? Allow the client to define the way they rank their brokers.
  2. Is it possible for the firm to do better? (i.e., move up in the client’s ranking).
  3. If so, what would be required? Ask the client what actions it will take for the firm to move up. This can be anything from senior management attention, more outgoing calls from analysts, changing sales coverage, or raising capital. These become the action items.
  4. What would it be worth to the firm? Ask the client to estimate the incremental revenue opportunity to the firm in each product if the the actions are taken. The sum of historical revenues plus these incremental amounts becomes the client budget.

The questions may be posed by sales people or independent persons or who are not conflicted over critical feedback. It is in the interest of the client to answer these questions, as they seek honest feedback and express a willingness to improve. Once the feedback is provided, an implicit contract is created between the client and the firm that if requirements are met, revenues will follow. It is equally important to find out if the client intends to reduce product trading, or if there is no way for the firm to do better.

When combined with historical revenues, the answers to these questions comprise a business plan for the client: prior revenues (reflected in the initial segmentation) may be adjusted by the amounts indicated by the client as potential increases or expected decreases. The plan must also document the actions or resources needed to achieve the budget. Clients with greater potential for increased revenues may receive higher tiering in the next iteration of client segmentation than suggested by their historical revenues alone.

Marketing From a Product Perspective

While the interview process seeks to uncover opportunities from a client perspective, a product-driven process can yield additional results. Each product area should have its own view of the client base that covers existing clients as well as prospects, and the priorities of the product areas can be represented in the segmentation discussion. A two-pronged analysis that covers the market from both client and product perspectives leads to a more thorough capture of opportunities. The matrix approach also improves governance.

The “product walk-across” report is very powerful for highlighting new revenue opportunities arising from introducing a client to additional products. Some opportunities are suggested by gaps in expected trading patterns: for example, hedge funds that trade ETFs may be candidates to trade index swaps; clients who trade cash and options in the U.S. but cash only in Europe are candidates to trade European options; clients who trade cash electronically may also be candidates to trade options the same way; macro investors who trade futures may be candidates to trade ETFs. Products that are similar or interchangeable may be new to the client or simply traded with another broker.

Product marketing is a process of identifying target clients and managing a concerted effort or “campaign” to introduce the targets to the product. Product marketers can identify candidates from gaps in the multi-product revenue report, and also draw from anecdotal market information and industry surveys that highlight clients who are known to trade in specific products with other brokers.

Clients are more likely to try a new product if it solves a problem for them. The product on its own merits may be undifferentiated, but the broker may be able to add value by identifying an application for the product in the client’s portfolio. Solutions-based marketing creates “demand-pull” which can superior to “product-push” in stimulating or accelerating product utilization. Clients are also more likely to take a meeting on portfolio themes than product presentations. Common thematic campaigns include risk management and hedging, emerging markets access, and tax efficiency.

The opportunities uncovered though product marketing may be cross-referenced and added to the client plans. The product-driven effort may reinforce findings from client interviews, but should also find potential opportunities that the client itself may not have recognized, as well as identifying clients who are not otherwise covered by existing relationships.

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