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Archive for the ‘Equities’ Category

What constitutes a “full-service” Equities business?

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[Part 4 of Equities Context and Content]

Mature Equities businesses offer a complete array of products and services under the umbrella of Equities. The full-service Equities model incorporates five diversified business lines, each of which has a set of products and services that capture revenue in various forms:

  1. NEW ISSUE
    Origination business based on corporate relationships, resulting in direct underwriting and placement fees and indirect revenues from investor clients seeking to participate in their allocation. Examples include: common and preferred equity, convertible bonds, and private placements.
  2. FLOW
    Agency risk transfer business resulting in commissions and the potential for reduced expenses due to internalization. Examples include: “high-touch” and/or electronic order handling in cash equities and listed derivatives.
  3. BALANCE SHEET
    Financing businesses resulting in accrual of spreads in excess of cost of funding. Examples include: prime brokerage, securities lending, repo, and OTC derivatives.
  4. CAPITAL
    Principal trading businesses, including market-making and client facilitation, resulting in revenues from bid/offer spreads and directional risk-taking. Examples include: underwriting, block trading, aspects of program trading, listed options market-making, and certain proprietary trading strategies.
  5. SERVICES
    Low-risk, operationally-intensive agency business resulting in fee income tied to balances or transactions. Examples include: custody, administration, cash and collateral management.

 

A comprehensive offering allows such firms to compete globally for all client segments and to address the entire available revenue pool. As shown in Table 2, McKinsey estimates the global revenues that may be directly linked to Equities at over $120 billion in 2010.

Figure 2 illustrates the five Equities business lines in a way that circumscribes the revenue pool:

Table 2

Table 2: Equities-related revenue pools / Figure 2: Equities revenue map

Diversification can reduce earnings volatility and reliance on new issue activity. Of the five dimensions, flow commissions in cash and derivatives account for 39% of the pool, a fact that leads all competing firms to focus on execution capability. With more than twice as much revenue at stake overall, diversified firms not only access the related pools, but may also have an advantage competing for flow.

The capabilities or limitations of a larger firm directly impacts the ability of its Equities business to compete in each of the five dimensions. For example, the firm’s ability to allocate balance sheet and capital to its Equities business allows Equities to offer financing products or to carry inventory in convertible bonds. Similarly, Corporate Banking could drive new issue supply through the Equities business via its capital markets efforts.

Written by highlineadvisors

November 9, 2011 at 12:41 pm

Why does the firm context matter?

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[Part 3 of Equities Context and Content]

There are five bank or broker-dealer businesses that can significantly enhance a firm’s Equities business. The capabilities and resources “owned” by these other business units can provide a competitive advantage in attracting equity investors:

  • CORPORATE BANKING
    Direct lending and corporate finance can produce two of the resources most valued by investors: new issues and access to corporate management. The Equities business can in turn provide market color on previously-issued equities and related derivatives to bankers and their corporate clients, earning mandates for share repurchases and block trades. The two business units can also share the cost of Research within applicable regulatory limitations.
  • PRIVATE WEALTH MANAGEMENT
    Retail can be a powerful contributor to an Equities business through the direction of order flow and stock loan balances. A captive source of liquidity and commissions provides a boost to the sales and trading unit, and a unique supply of hard-to-borrow securities can differentiate the prime brokerage unit. A retail distribution network may be viewed favorably by both corporate clients awarding new issues and block trades, and asset managers seeking capital.
  • TRADING IN OTHER GLOBAL MARKETS ASSET CLASSES
    Trading capabilities in complimentary asset classes can provide research, market color, and occasional trade facilitation for equity investors. Single-name credit products such as corporate bonds and credit default swaps can provide investors with deeper insight into corporate capital structures. Index, currency, and rate products offer investors a means to hedge macro exposures in their portfolios. Commodities trading expertise can also provide macro insights as well as deeper understanding of companies in the energy, agriculture, and metals sectors. Broader trading capabilities can provide solutions for cash and liquidity management in repo, government securities, and corporate commercial paper.
  • CUSTODIAL/TRANSACTION BANKING
    Custodial Banking can strengthen relationships with both corporate and investor clients. On the corporate side, credit lines, treasury services, cash management, and payments processing can lead to increased access to management and participation in new issues. On the investor side, clearing, collateral management, custody, securities services, and fund administration can result in operational dependencies between the firm and its investor clients. Banks with a deposit base may enjoy a higher credit rating, thereby enhancing the ability of an Equity business to compete in prime brokerage and over-the-counter derivatives.
  • ASSET MANAGEMENT
    There are a number of regulatory constraints and perceived conflicts that weigh on the synergies between an Equities trading business and a related Asset Management subsidiary; however, a percentage of agency order flow from the Asset Management arm may be directed to the Equities business, and access to stock loan supply can support its prime brokerage and derivatives trading efforts. Partnership in the creation of equity-linked ETFs and structured notes can generate product supply for retail and wholesale investors. Apart from trading, Asset Management provides a means to monetize Research, in some cases alongside of investor clients.

Figure 1 illustrates some of the contributions of these five business units to the traditional business of Equities and its clients:

Figure 1

Figure 1: How Firm Context for Equities Enhances Investor Value

Clients care about what a bank or broker-dealer can do for them overall, without concerning themselves with a firm’s internal product boundaries or management organization. When broader capabilities are called for, collaboration with other internal business units becomes critical to the success of the Equities franchise.

What do investor clients really want?

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[Part 2 of Equities Context and Content]

The needs of investor clients are complex and involve much more than the execution of orders. By convention, clients rely on their execution commissions (and, in some cases, financing balances) to obtain additional resources from their brokers. As clients ascribe less value to pure execution, they are directing the bulk of their commissions toward more valuable services and scarce resources.

Table 1 shows the capabilities of a bank or broker-dealer, some or all of which may be meaningful to an institutional investor:

Table 1

Table 1: Components of an Investor Client Value Proposition

The table also illustrates two challenging aspects of Equities businesses: First, that there is no direct revenue associated with many of these resources and services. Second, that these resources and services can lie beyond the traditional purview of Equities management. A successful Equities business must deploy the full capabilities of its firm and direct them at investor clients to access all potential sources of revenue, direct and indirect.

Equities Content and Context

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We are launching a series and associated white paper entitled “Equities Content and Context: Comparative Business Models Among Banks and Broker-Dealers.”

“Don’t get involved in partial problems, but always take flight to where there is a free view over the whole single great problem, even if this view is still not a clear one.”  —  Ludwig Wittgenstein
“What you see is what you get.” — Flip Wilson

Article at a Glance

Declining revenues and pending regulation are forcing firms to review their Equities businesses. Competing Equities businesses differ greatly from firm to firm in the breadth of capabilities. As a result, some firms may be unable to access revenue pools that make competitors appear more successful in comparison. A closer look at how a firm’s strengths appeal to specific client segments can reveal why an Equities business is underperforming relative to the market or its peers. An understanding of “boutique” models can provide insight for large banks and smaller broker-dealers alike, whether they are contemplating further investment or a pull-back.

The value of an Equities business to investors is largely dependent on the capabilities of the firm in which it operates. Despite an advantage in breadth of capabilities, large firms that fail to deliver a wide range of products may end up with boutique-like results. Small firms forced to compete on a limited product set can still distinguish themselves in specific market segments.

This article explores the following questions as they relate to managing an Equities business:

  • What do investor clients really want?
    What are the products, resources, and services that are most valuable to their business?
  • Why does the firm context matter?
    How can other business lines contribute to the success of an Equities franchise?
  • What constitutes a “full-service” Equities business?
    What do the largest, mature Equities businesses offer to clients? What additional revenues do they capture?
  • How is client value converted into revenue?
    How are products positioned as client solutions?
  • How do Equities businesses align with investors?
    Which clients is the firm most likely to attract?
  • What are the partial or “boutique” Equities business models?
    How do firms successfully differentiate? How can a regional or sector-based strategy succeed?
The article and its diagrams will be provided here in subsequent posts. If you can’t wait for the serialization, download the full article here.

Streamlining Equities

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High Line Advisors has published an article entitled Streamlining Equities: Ten Operating Strategies for Competing in Today’s Markets. A PDF of the article is available here.

“Whosoever desires constant success must change his conduct with the times.” — Niccolo Machiavelli

Article at a Glance

Equity sales and trading (“Equities”) is a core business for many banks and broker-dealers, on its own merits and because of its synergies with corporate banking and wealth management. Like all capital markets businesses, Equities under increasing pressure from electronic trading, reduced leverage, increased capital requirements, regulation of over-the-counter derivatives, and limitations on proprietary trading.

New operating conditions call for a leaner operating model to protect revenue and maintain growth, starting with a reevaluation of the product silos that require so many specialists. Profitability also depends on the firm’s ability to deliver resources to clients and capture trades with greater efficiency. Success requires re-thinking the entire legacy organization, looking at new ways to combine or expand roles, and reevaluating the skills that are needed on the team.

These ten initiatives in sales, trading, and operations, can help management streamline the Equities organization for greater top line revenue and increased operating leverage:

  1. Recast “Research Sales” for delivery of all products and firm resources
  2. Create “Execution Sales” to maximize trade capture across products
  3. Rebalance Coverage Assignments to foster team selling for client wallet capture
  4. Fortify Multi-Product Marketing to maximize product penetration and client wallet share
  5. Deploy Sector Specialists to generate alpha and raise internal market intelligence
  6. Implement a Central Risk Desk to consolidate position management and client coverage
  7. Merge Secured Funding Activity to manage collateral funding and risk
  8. Centralize Structured Products to eliminate redundancy and internal conflict
  9. Reengineer Client Integration for speed and control of non-market risks 
  10. Normalize Client Service to eliminate duplicate processes and improve client experience

Collateral Management: Best Practices for Broker-Dealers

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High Line Advisors has published an article entitled Collateral Management: Best Practices for Broker-Dealers. A PDF of the article is available here.

col•lat•er•al (noun)
something pledged as security for repayment of a loan, to be forfeited in the event of a default.

col•lat•er•al dam•age (noun)
used euphemistically to refer to inadvertent casualties among civilians and destruction in civilian areas in the course of military operations. — Oxford American Dictionary

Article at a Glance

Stand-alone broker-dealers, as well as those operating within banks and bank holding companies, face increasing pressure to minimize costs and balance sheet footprint. Collateral management is a set of processes that optimize the use and funding of securities on the balance sheet. For a broker-dealer, sources of collateral include securities purchased outright, as risk positions or derivatives hedges, and securities borrowed. Additional securities are obtained through rehypothecation of customer assets pledged in principal transactions such as repurchase agreements (repo), margin loans, and over-the-counter (OTC) derivatives. This pool of securities is deployed throughout the trading day. At the close of trading, the remaining securities become collateral in a new set of transactions used to raise the cash needed to carry the positions. Poor collateral management leads to excessive operating costs, and, in the extreme, insolvency.

A disciplined trading operation aims to be “self-funding” by borrowing the cash needed to run the business in the secured funding markets rather than relying on corporate treasury and expensive, unsecured sources such as commercial paper and long-term debt. The funding transaction may be with other customers, dealers, or money market funds via tripartite repo. Careful management of the settlement cycle for various transactions allows a broker-dealer to finance the purchase of a security by simultaneously entering into a repo, loan, or swap on the same security or other collateral.

Many aspects of secured funding and collateral management are common to all trading desks. A centralized and coordinated collateral management function supports the implementation of several best practices and provides transparency for control groups and regulators. Regulation and increased dealings with central counterparty clearing arrangements will soon increase capital and cash requirements imposed on broker-dealers. Even in advance of such changes, customers are placing restrictions on the disposition of their assets and limitations on the access granted to broker-dealers. This trend makes it more critical for dealers to optimize their remaining sources of funding.

Note that the prime brokerage area of a bank or broker-dealer is in the best position to manage the collateral pool as a utility on behalf of the entire global markets trading operation. For more detail, see “The Future of Prime Brokerage,” High Line Advisors LLC, 2010. Figure 1 from the article is provided below. A print-quality PDF may be downloaded from our website here.

Collateral Management for Broker-Dealers

Finding New Revenue Opportunities

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[part of a series on hedge fund sales coverage]

Existing client revenues may be sustained or even increased in a bull market, but a firm stands a better chance of achieving growth even in bear markets if planning is deliberate and focused on specific opportunities. Fortunately, new revenue opportunities may be found through direct client feedback and some basic marketing.

Sales managers need a minimum amount of useful data that can be acted upon for maximum impact on revenue. A practical client plan must be succinct, easily prepared and easily understood. The planning must be done by the salespeople who know the client best, but supported by data and standards for comparison. Many client planning processes either have too little data or become frustrated in their attempts to collect too much detail. At one extreme, plans based on salesperson intuition are not robust and may be clouded by incentives. At the other extreme, it is impossible to collect precise data from clients who are unwilling to disclose the details of their product utilization or spending to the broker community as a whole. Industry-wide surveys and fee pools may be directionally useful but are not specific enough to optimize the unique relationship between an individual broker and client.

Developing Client Plans

In our experience, a basic but useful client plan consist of three items: an organization chart of the client at the fund level, a budget showing revenue expectation at the product level), and one or more action items required to achieve the budget.

At a minimum, an organization chart for an institutional investor should indicate:

  1. assets under management (using size as a rough proxy for revenue potential)
  2. allocation of assets among various investment strategies (using strategy as an indicator of product and resource needs)
  3. decision makers for each strategy (to identify whom to target for relationship building)

It is best to ask the client directly rather than to rely on assumptions that may be incorrect or incomplete. A map of the client organization can expose any misconceptions regarding their investment activity and lead to the discovery of new revenue opportunities. For example, a convertible bond salesperson may not register that the client also has a distressed equity fund until the salesperson is asked to map the entire client organization. The investment strategies used by the client immediately suggest product utilization, which can be confirmed in subsequent discussions with the client. Existing relationships can provide the introductions needed to open up new trading lines. Simply “connecting the dots” in this way does not require elaborate planning and can yield immediate results.

The next step is to identify potential for revenue improvement. We suggest that detailed knowledge of a client’s wallet are not necessary to manage a successful sales effort. Instead, only a few key pieces of information are needed, and these may be readily extracted from the clients themselves:

  1. What is the firm’s rank with the client? For each product the client trades (i.e., single stock cash), where does the client currently rank the firm? #1? Top 3? Top 5? First tier? Second tier? Allow the client to define the way they rank their brokers.
  2. Is it possible for the firm to do better? (i.e., move up in the client’s ranking).
  3. If so, what would be required? Ask the client what actions it will take for the firm to move up. This can be anything from senior management attention, more outgoing calls from analysts, changing sales coverage, or raising capital. These become the action items.
  4. What would it be worth to the firm? Ask the client to estimate the incremental revenue opportunity to the firm in each product if the the actions are taken. The sum of historical revenues plus these incremental amounts becomes the client budget.

The questions may be posed by sales people or independent persons or who are not conflicted over critical feedback. It is in the interest of the client to answer these questions, as they seek honest feedback and express a willingness to improve. Once the feedback is provided, an implicit contract is created between the client and the firm that if requirements are met, revenues will follow. It is equally important to find out if the client intends to reduce product trading, or if there is no way for the firm to do better.

When combined with historical revenues, the answers to these questions comprise a business plan for the client: prior revenues (reflected in the initial segmentation) may be adjusted by the amounts indicated by the client as potential increases or expected decreases. The plan must also document the actions or resources needed to achieve the budget. Clients with greater potential for increased revenues may receive higher tiering in the next iteration of client segmentation than suggested by their historical revenues alone.

Marketing From a Product Perspective

While the interview process seeks to uncover opportunities from a client perspective, a product-driven process can yield additional results. Each product area should have its own view of the client base that covers existing clients as well as prospects, and the priorities of the product areas can be represented in the segmentation discussion. A two-pronged analysis that covers the market from both client and product perspectives leads to a more thorough capture of opportunities. The matrix approach also improves governance.

The “product walk-across” report is very powerful for highlighting new revenue opportunities arising from introducing a client to additional products. Some opportunities are suggested by gaps in expected trading patterns: for example, hedge funds that trade ETFs may be candidates to trade index swaps; clients who trade cash and options in the U.S. but cash only in Europe are candidates to trade European options; clients who trade cash electronically may also be candidates to trade options the same way; macro investors who trade futures may be candidates to trade ETFs. Products that are similar or interchangeable may be new to the client or simply traded with another broker.

Product marketing is a process of identifying target clients and managing a concerted effort or “campaign” to introduce the targets to the product. Product marketers can identify candidates from gaps in the multi-product revenue report, and also draw from anecdotal market information and industry surveys that highlight clients who are known to trade in specific products with other brokers.

Clients are more likely to try a new product if it solves a problem for them. The product on its own merits may be undifferentiated, but the broker may be able to add value by identifying an application for the product in the client’s portfolio. Solutions-based marketing creates “demand-pull” which can superior to “product-push” in stimulating or accelerating product utilization. Clients are also more likely to take a meeting on portfolio themes than product presentations. Common thematic campaigns include risk management and hedging, emerging markets access, and tax efficiency.

The opportunities uncovered though product marketing may be cross-referenced and added to the client plans. The product-driven effort may reinforce findings from client interviews, but should also find potential opportunities that the client itself may not have recognized, as well as identifying clients who are not otherwise covered by existing relationships.

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